jolly well done chaps!

Our gallant trio did us proud. Lead by the fearless Andrew Brown, the redoubtable Mike Ramsey and the amused John McCullough took Berlin by storm, competing in the Friedrich World Masters 2013. They return, heads held high, triumphant in their winning a bit and not actually coming last. Super effort!

Here is Andrew’s report:

“Regular readers of this blog will know that Britain had three entrants in this year’s Friedrich World Championship in Berlin. Myself, Michael Ramsey and John Mccullough all flew over to keep the British end up. Other entrants flocked in from the U.S.A., Sweden, The Netherlands, Estonia and various parts of Germany. As always game designer Richard Sivél was on hand to keep score, order pizza, act as umpire, play in some of the games and organise the whole thing with typical Germanic efficiency.

The competitors play the game 4 times and score points for capturing objectives or, in case of Friedrich himself, how long he survive – each player of that role hoping that they too can survive the conflict known as the Seven Years War.

The roles are: In the blue corner: Friedrich der Große of Prussia supported by Hanover. In the green corner: Elizabeth, Czarina of Russia aided by Sweden (Friedrich’s sister Ulrica is queen of Sweden). In the white and yellow corner: Maria Theresa of Austria supported by Prince Joseph von Saxe-Hildburghausen (the biggest name on the board!) with the Imperial Army. Lastly in the red corner: Madame de Pompadour the real power behind Louis XV of France.
All Friedrich has to do is wait for the Czarina to drink her self to death, Sweden to make peace and France – engaged in a costly war in Canada and India with Britain – to go bankrupt. How hard can it be? Very hard is the answer! Wheel out the club’s copy and have a go, you’ll soon see.

The four highest scoring players fight the war one final time to decide who will be World Champion.

We all had lots of fun. I got more points (including more points with Friedrich himself) than ever before. Due to the ingenious way the tournament is organised we did not play each other. I think that Michael’s epic 19 turn game (and 5+ hours!) game stood out. His opponents fought hard; and he defended heroically before the Austrians finally broke his defenses down.

John did the best of us with 36 points in 14th place, I netted 34 points in 20th place, Michael got 32.7 in 25th place – 34 places in all. The British players each got more points than former World Champions Anton Telle and Steffan Shröder, an achievement of a kind.

We also had time to see some of Berlin, and John and Michael made a visit to the Jewish museum.”

So actually, very well done! It is a tough game, and to have three players from our club place so well against strong opposition is impressive. Thanks too, for the support from club members like Mark, Gareth and others who’ve been playing the game with our three both inside and out of the club, to let them practise and prepare. And thanks too too to Histogames, the publisher, for letting the club get two of their excellent games on the sly, one being Friedrich, so you can try it out.

In fact John is very happy to teach you the game in the new year. He says “It is an elegant strategic wargame based on the 7 years war, which takes 3-6 hours to play. Elegant because the main rules are few and easy to learn, but it offers many different strategies to win and an element of luck which represents historical fate.” Please get in touch with John by email (jjj_mccullough@yahoo.co.uk) or talk with him in the club.

Oh yes, congratulations to Manni Wichmann, the winner!

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